Using Digital Humanities to Energize Students, Enrich Research, and Engage the Public

 

LAJSA XVIII International Research Conference

Universidad Iberoamericana

Mexico City, Mexico

July 3-5, 2017

       Prezi for this talk: https://tinyurl.com/LAJSAPrezi

 

Digital Toolbox

Resources for Interactive Presentations (Alternatives to PowerPoint and Keynote)

Resource for Student Assignments

Here are some free digital tools that are useful for student projects.  Don’t see what you want?  Look at Project Bamboo‘s Bamboo DIRT ”a tool, service, and collection registry of digital research tools for scholarly use" or Alan Liu's DH Toychest.  Both are particularly useful as they break down a list of tools based on what you want to do with it (e.g. create a mashup, analyze texts, visualize data, etc.).

Selected Examples of Digital Humanities Projects

Professors'  and Professional Projects

  • Archives and text matching : Friedberg  Jewish Manuscript Society. A centralized gateway to six websites of important Jewish manuscripts including those of the Cairo Geniza.  For the Geniza project Prof. Ya’acov Choueka, a Cairo-born chief computerization scientist led a team of 15 programmers from the Friedberg Geniza Project to “solve the problem” of genizas, or Jewish archives, by scanning the contents of 67 geniza collections around the world. The team has made more matches between fragments in a matter of weeks than researchers did using traditional methods over the course of decades.

  • Archives and collaborative translation (uses Omeka): The Rabat Geniza Project. The collection documents the global scope of textual culture in modern Jewish Morocco, with representative publications from throughout  North Africa (e.g. Oran, Tunis), the Middle East (e.g. Jerusalem, Netivot), Europe (e.g. Vilna, Livorno, Warsaw, Paris), and North America (e.g. New York, Montreal).

  • Archive that allows visitors to contribute: Digital Monuments to the Jews of the Netherlands. This collection provides access to  people, households, and addresses and allows visitors to add images and information. Prezi explaining the project.

  • Blog and Archive for Jewish Studies Program: Stroum Center, UW. This website uses a variety of tools to connect the Jewish community of Seattle to the work being done in the program.

  • Mapping: Slave Revolt in Jamaica, 1760-1761.  This project uses interactive maps to help analyze the slave revolt and to present how it happened in visual form.

  • Textual Analysis (uses MALLET): The Networked Corpus.  This project uses a digital tool designed to analyze and display the density of topics in a particular work of literature.

  • Textual Analysis (using Voyant): Examples of Voyant in Research.

  • Mapping: Mapping Colonial Americas Publishing Project.  This project uses maps to help analyze and to visualize New World printing over geographic space and across literary genres from European contact to 1800.

  • Textual Analysis (uses Voyant for text mining, among other tools): “Lincoln Logarithms: Finding Meaning in the Sermons” (“We explored the power and possibility of four digital tools—MALLET, Voyant, Paper Machines, and Viewshare”).

  • Textual Analysis: "Feminist Markup and Meaningful Text Analysis in Digital Literary Archives," by Hannah Schilperoort. Examines three digital archives of women writers--University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s Willa Cather Archive, Northeastern University’s Women Writers Online, and University of Alberta’s Orlando Project--for evidence of encoding practices and computational text analysis experimentation that supports feminist scholarship.

  • Archive/Image Sharing (Omeka): check a long list of Omeka projects.

  • Art Archives: Stephen A. Sadow, Latin American Jewish Art

  • UCLA Digital Humanities Projects: a wide range of faculty projects from a variety of departments.

  • JDC Archives.  Special collections on Latin American Jews.

  • Archive of early Jewish American Materials:  Jewish Atlantic World Database; resources for using in the classroom.

Student Projects

Journals

Blogs sobre humanidades digitales